Archive for May 2nd, 2012

May 02, 2012
|

It’s no secret that I absolutely love my job.  Photography, my passion for traveling and all of my other hobbies tend to keep my day planner so full that I rarely am home longer than the amount of time it takes to sleep and grab a cup of coffee on my way out the door in the morning.  At times when I begin to feel overwhelmed, I stop and think of how much has changed since my grandmother was a new bride and how fortunate women are to have the choice to either stay home and raise their family or persue their career.   They cooked, cleaned, did laundry, ironed, sewed, canned, baked and the list goes on!  Although being a mom is the hardest job ever (and something I’m looking forward to in the future), I’m grateful that I have opportunities that my grandmother’s generation didn’t necessarily have.  My grandmother and her mom were actually apart of Shadpoint’s Homemakers’ Club. “We would exchange our recipes and play games.  The best part of our homemaker’s club was dessert!  We met in different members’ homes to have our meetings,” Mom Mom said.  “We chatted a lot.  It was our gossip feast.”

 The above photo is of my grandmother’s first cookbook from when she was married placed in a cast iron skillet.  “Mother used to have homemade biscuits on the table every night for dinner,” she explained.  “One of the best meals I ever liked was canned tenderloin from our hogs, homemade applesauce and hot biscuits.”  My grandmother was telling me how her mother used to make yeast rolls during the war and would send her and her two older brothers up and down the street during dinner time and sell them for 50 cents a dozen.  “I was about 12. It was her way of bringing in extra change.”  My great-grandmother used to can beets, string beans, tomatoes, corn, peaches and pepper relish.  We use her recipe to this day and make a new batch of pepper relish every two years.  I’m no Betty Crocker, but with the helping hand of DiGiorno- I make a bangin’ pizza. :)

Now let’s talk about laundry.  You can see my great-grandmother Esther hanging clothes on a line in the snow.  Both of my great-grandmothers used a metal wash bin and washboard (pictured above, right).  My grandfather explained that his mother would make her own soap by using hog fat left over from a hog killing and mix that with lye (a corrosive and poisonous substance they used for cleaning) and then boil it on the stove top.  When it cooled, she took the soap and cut it into squares.  “On Monday mornings, she boiled water and put it in one of the large metal basins.  Then she placed a cake of handmade soap on the wash board and let her clothes soak in the hot water.  Then she’d use both hands and scrub the garments on the washboard.  After that, she put them in her rinse tub and then would wring them out and then pinned them up on the clothesline.  She put two or three cast irons on the stove to heat up so that by the time the clothes were dry she could iron them out,” Pop Pop said.  “You hoped you had a gentle breeze and warm sun.  She’d put all the clothes in her laundry basket and bring them in before dark to iron them.  I remember her always wetting her finger and touching the iron to make sure it was hot enough.  You’d iron with the first one and when it cooled off you’d grab the next one off of the stove.”  Below is the actual laundry basket my great-grandmother Cooper used.

“But what if it rained?” I asked.  “Oh, well that’s when you used this wooden laundry hanger that you kept inside,” Mom Mom said as she pulled out this apparatus that looked more like a torcher device rather than a useful tool. (pictured below)  I couldn’t imagine my laundry taking up most of my day!

My great-grandmothers also sewed and embroidered.  “My mother used to sew dresses and smocks for me.  I remember her hosting and going to quilting bees.  She would set up in her livingroom and ladies from the neighborhood would come to our house and help make a quit,” Mom Mom said.

Times have certainly changed for women over the decades.  I’m glad I can pick up my crochet needles and yarn or try out a new recipe out of leisure instead of necessity.  This is one of the many reasons I am so fond of history. :)

May 02, 2012
|

I met laura at the what’s up weddings bridal show earlier this year and I knew as soon as I met her and her mother, that I would love working with them! first off, they were just great and she and alber were getting married at a gorgeous venue  – the chesapeake bay enviromental center – and I knew that her vision would be such a great match for our photography. a few weeks ago laura contacted me because she and alber, who live in connecticut, were going to be in maryland for a few days and they wanted to set up their esession. when she mentioned the william paca house as the location, I was so happy – such a beautiful spot. we also took advantage of already being in downtown annapolis and strolled the streets a bit after we wrapped up at the paca house. meeting alber for the first time and seeing them together gave me a glimpse into just how great their wedding is going to be. they were so sweet together and had such an ease, it was like my big camera and I weren’t even there :)

thanks so much for a great day – I’m looking so forward to working with you!